Local Holocaust and Intolerance Museum Combats Hate Through Education

Hate and intolerance have been a part of an unfortunate world history and even current modern events. The Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico is helping Albuquerque and the world remember these injustices; in hopes to prevent future acts of hate and genocide.

Local Holocaust and Intolerance Museum Combats Hate Through Education from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

While hate and intolerance are words that seem ugly on their own, they can become something tragically worse. These words are actions that can become violent and damaging to everyone involved. Unfortunately these are words that are not out grown even though they are not words known to a new born. In a Tolerance for Teen’s factoid it states that, an individual is not born with hate for a whole group of people for any reason other than one’s own bias. But instead this form of hate is a learned behavior. Since this is a learned behavior it means hate and intolerance can be avoided.

The word “hate crime” wasn’t really in use until after World War II, in which a government attempted a racial genocide. The Holocaust was a period of time from January 30th 1933 until May 8th 1945. During this time more than six million Jews and five million others deemed as inferior by Hitler and the German Nazi regime were systematically exterminated. Some of the five million included homosexuals, mentally or physically impaired, Gypsies, religious groups and anyone who really opposed the Nazi regime. Even before the Holocaust there was the Armenian Genocide of the early 20th century by the Ottoman government. The Ottomans also attempted a systematic extermination, by forced deportations and massacres of the Armenians in what is now modern day Turkey.

Harold L. Folley, volunteer at the Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico in Albuquerque. (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Harold L. Folley, volunteer at the Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico in Albuquerque. (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Additionally the United States has also had moments of hate and intolerance, from slavery in the 17th to 19th centuries to modern intolerance of sexual orientation, race and religion. The Southern Poverty Law Center monitors some 1,007 known hate groups operating across the United States. In the 2012 statistics released by the FBI in the Offense Type by Bias Motivation report, race has the highest total offenses. The total offenses motivated by sexual orientation and religion combined do not even total the offenses committed on a race bias. While the majority of hate crimes in the United States are race motivated, the offender is mostly driven by the desire for excitement.

The Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico stands as a reminder that nothing good comes from intolerance and hate based on what a person is as opposed to who they are: a son, a mother, a daughter or even a father. While the museum is that reminder it promotes people to be the conduit of change against all forms of hate.

  

K. Charles Moore

2 Comments

  1. I can’t wait to check this place out! I Definitely plan on spending some time there.

  2. It is a very interesting and important place that reminds us of the destruction and devastation caused by hate. The museum promotes education to combat hate and intolerance, knowledge is a powerful tool!

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