The Art and Craft

The Art and Craft is a segment dedicated to capturing the city of Albuquerque through a photographic medium. With murals and locations as unique as the inhabitants, this is an attempt to capture the art and scenery, which often gets overlooked. Modern Albuquerque is defined by the unique diversity of cultures converging to create a one of a kind city. This culture is defined by the arts and craft that the various communities share with the city and its visitors, leaving a craving to relive locations or the wonderful sites witnessed through travel.

A car in the Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

A car in the Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Murals, graffiti and other forms of art decorate much of Central Avenue. Nob Hill on historic Route 66 is one district that encompasses some wonderful and intriguing murals and art that reflects the community. The heart of Albuquerque’s Route 66, Nob Hill has an eclectic mix of local businesses and remarkable artists.

Slice Parlor mural on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Slice Parlor mural on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Slice Parlor mural on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Slice Parlor mural on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Slice Parlor mural on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Slice Parlor mural on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Unknown mural next to Tractor Brewing Company on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Unknown mural next to Tractor Brewing Company on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Much of the historic Nob Hill district holds memories of the motels and other places that once stood and original signs still stand as artistic markers of these memories. With the big skies as backdrops these historic markers remain the forethought of Nob Hill. The art of graffiti is mixed in as modern murals reflect the diversity of the culture represented in this historic district.

Historic Aztec Motel sign on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Historic Aztec Motel sign on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Barber Drews right off Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Barber Drews right off Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Barber Drews right off Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Barber Drews right off Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Mural on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Mural on Central Avenue, Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Tiny Feet. Art billboard Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Tiny Feet. Art billboard Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Girl holding sun billboard Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Girl Holding Sunset. Art billboard Nob Hill district. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

The Art and Craft

The Art and Craft is a segment dedicated to capturing the city of Albuquerque through a photographic medium. With murals and locations as unique as the inhabitants, this is an attempt to capture the art and scenery, which often gets overlooked. Modern Albuquerque is defined by the unique diversity of cultures converging to create a one of a kind city. This culture is defined by the arts and craft that the various communities share with the city and its visitors, leaving a craving to relive locations or the wonderful sites witnessed through travel.

Downtown Neighborhood Association sign on Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Downtown Neighborhood Association sign on Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Much of Central Avenue is decorated by murals that reflect the business types, seen here on the side of the El Rey theater is the art of a time when the theater was active in the craft of entertainment.

People walking by the El Rey theater on Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

People walking by the El Rey theater on Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Mural painted on the El Rey theater, Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Mural painted on the El Rey theater, Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Mural painted on the El Rey theater, Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)<span style="font-size: 14px; line-height: 1.5em;"></span>

Mural painted on the El Rey theater, Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Even parts of downtown have amazing murals that depict businessmen and nature scenes; against the blue sky backdrop large buildings break the horizon to accommodate the working class of downtown Albuquerque.

Buildings in downtown Albuquerque with nature-inspired murals. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Buildings in downtown Albuquerque with nature-inspired murals. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Businessmen mural just off Central Avenue on 7th Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Businessmen mural just off Central Avenue on 7th Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Tucked away on side streets that make up the backbone of downtown Albuquerque are beautiful murals that reflect the neighborhood and culture. Some of these murals are easy to find and others are hidden into the cityscape, seemingly only created for the amusement of the artist.

"The Styx" - Graffiti mural on Coal Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

“The Styx” – Graffiti mural on Coal Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

"The Styx" - Graffiti mural on Coal Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

“The Styx” – Graffiti mural on Coal Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Gaming graffiti mural on Lead Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Gaming graffiti mural on Lead Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Gaming graffiti mural on Lead Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Gaming graffiti mural on Lead Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Local Neighborhood Bakery Holds the Key to Success

Local neighborhood bakery featured on the Food Network, Golden Crown Panaderia has found success for more than 25 years by keeping it simple and being happy.

Local Neighborhood Bakery Holds the Key to Success from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

The Golden Crown Panaderia has been supplying the local community with an old-fashioned approach to baked goods and business practices. This approach has been successful mainly in part to the inviting environment created by the father and son duo, Pratt Morales and son Christopher Morales. For over 25 years this small bakery has been supplying much of Albuquerque with original breads and pastries. However not everything is old-fashioned about this neighborhood bakery.

Latte Art by Christopher Morales - Golden Crown Panaderia (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Latte Art by Christopher Morales – Golden Crown Panaderia (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

While many of the practices and products have not changed, it is the latte art and indoor garden that has given the Golden Crown Panaderia a modern point. Christopher Morales has taken up a craft that visually express what he considers the perfect cup of coffee, by combining an espresso shot and steamed milk. This results in an authentic artistic decoration on the top of a latte. Christopher Morales also began the bakery’s one of a kind indoor garden. The garden often produces herbs and produce that the bakery uses for its baked goods and other food items.

When asked about the goal for the bakery Christopher Morales says, “To be honest the ultimate goal is to be able to enjoy our lives.”

Continuing, Morales explains that there is no wish to expand or become a corporation. The intention for the bakery is to create great food and a good atmosphere, but also to enjoy what they do for a living. Morales described how easy it is to get overwhelmed in the restaurant industry, and says that when this occurs the interaction with the customer is lost.

“Every new customer that comes into the place, we get to hear their story,” Morales illustrates while sharing a few examples.

The human element is what Morales enjoys the most about his career, and he thinks of the employees as family, ensuring that the staff continues to enjoy the work they do at the bakery. This old-fashioned bakery has a modern touch and greets customers with a warm hospitality, finding success through what brings them happiness.

Guild Cinema: The Independent Art House Continues to Celebrate Cinematography

For more than a decade the Guild Cinema has welcomed guests into an intimate environment, giving viewers a chance to witness independent and foreign films, along with hosting events and film festivals.

Guild Cinema: The Independent Art House Continues to Celebrate Cinematography from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

Originally when the Guild Cinema opened its doors in 1966 it catered to a more mature crowd, in adult entertainment. This was short-lived, and since then has had a few owners along the way. Today’s owners Keif Henley and Don Sherry are keeping the independent art house alive with events, foreign films, indie films and wonderful cinematography not shown in large chain theaters.

The Guild Cinema is located in the Nob Hill district of Albuquerque and this classic art house theater is one of a kind. Many of the indie style theaters in Albuquerque have come and gone while the Guild has been holding strong. This is in part due to the wonderful audience, who come to view the great classics, independent, and even foreign films presented at the Guild Cinema. Henley and Sherry have also been successful in choosing films that are often a hit for their box office, and this comes from the years of enjoying the films themselves. Many who come in can be entrusted to get a lively conversation about the film they have just watched. This is because Henley and Sherry watch every film that is shown in their theater. Making the film exposure personal is part of the success that brings audiences back to the Guild for a meaningful experience in cinematography.

Guild Cinema Publication for Upcoming Events and Show Times - Click to Enhance (Guild Cinema Publication)

Guild Cinema Publication for Upcoming Events and Show Times – Click to Enhance (Guild Cinema Publication)

Each year the Guild hosts the Southwest Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, an event that has become one of the longest running film festivals in New Mexico. The Cinema often hosts other special events as well, such as the Alibi Midnight Movie. With an upcoming event for Cinco de Mayo, Henley and Sherry also plan to screen the movie shot and directed by Sergei Eisenstein entitled, Que Viva Mexico. In a project that began during the Great Depression, this film documents and portrays Mexico’s history and culture.

While continuing to educate its audience through cinematography, the Guild Cinema is leaving its viewers with an experience that gives a better understanding on the art and appreciation of filmmaking.

The Albuquerque Museum Invites Visitors Into the Homes of the Spanish American Elite of the New World

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898, is an exhibition on display at The Albuquerque Museum that explores themes from the private lives of the Spanish American privileged, focusing on their homes in the early colonial era through the nineteenth century.

The Albuquerque Museum Invites Visitors Into the Homes of the Spanish American Elite of the New World from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

The exhibition itself demonstrates the wealth and lineage of the early Spanish Americans, through the homes and the objects that adorned each room. This is not just limited to great works of art but also the luxurious textiles, sculptures and items that made up the faith, wealth and socio-racial status of the colonial Spanish Americans.

Behind Closed Doors is the first major exhibition that showcases and explores the private lives, social structures, and wealth of Spain’s colonial era elite. The exhibition is on a four-city tour with Albuquerque being the second stop. When the early conquistadors ventured into the Americas they brought an affluent heritage along with them. Much of this heritage can be seen throughout New Mexican culture but not in such luxurious and grand standings.

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898, Center Gallery of Exhibition. The Albuquerque Museum - Albuquerque, New Mexico

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898, Center Gallery of Exhibition. The Albuquerque Museum – Albuquerque, New Mexico

The collection primarily consists of works from the Brooklyn Museum and boasts some 160 paintings, sculptures, prints, textiles, and decorative objects. What feels like the center of the exhibition is a screen depicting the Siege of Belgrade on the front and a decorative hunting scene on the reverse, this is a piece from Mexico, circa 1697-1701. Outstretching from this piece are large satellites of paintings and objects such as a bed frame gilded in gold that catches the light with a beautiful glow. With a commanding presence a large masterpiece by Francisco de Goya y Lucientes entitled Don Tadeo Bravo de Rivero hangs in the main room. This piece captures Tadeo Bravo, who is adorned with the cross and jeweled badge of the distinguished Spanish Order of Santiago.

Don Tadeo Bravo de Rivero, 1806 Oil on Canvas By Francisco de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish,1746-1828) at The Albuquerque Museum - Albuquerque, New Mexico

Don Tadeo Bravo de Rivero, 1806 Oil on Canvas By Francisco de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish,1746-1828) The Albuquerque Museum – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Many objects in this exhibition are placed, as they would have been viewed in these early Spanish American homes of the new world. Walking though each room gives the viewer a sense of going back in time, with the rich culture and extravagant icons of social standing the Spanish brought with them to the Americas.