Protesters Take to the Streets in Albuquerque Over Disapproval of Police Shootings

This is the second wave of protests amidst recent Albuquerque police shootings that have left a homeless man dead, it started at 12:00 pm MST and kicked off with the protest beginning on Central Avenue.

Many showed up wearing Guy Fawkes masks and holding signs in support of Anonymous. The cyber group Anonymous has taken down APD sites with cyber attacks and even intercepted cabq.gov official email contents. Anonymous is standing with the demonstrators calling for a change.

The protests began on Central Avenue but the demonstrators marched to the Albuquerque Police Department. This is where many spoke about their experiences and called for an end to the shootings. The demonstrators were later met with police in riot gear once the march headed downtown. With the protesters calling for change, will the city of Albuquerque listen; two protests in one-week makes it certain they have heard the call.

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

The Art and Craft

The Art and Craft is a segment dedicated to capturing the city of Albuquerque through a photographic medium. With murals and locations as unique as the inhabitants, this is an attempt to capture the art and scenery, which often gets overlooked. Modern Albuquerque is defined by the unique diversity of cultures converging to create a one of a kind city. This culture is defined by the arts and craft that the various communities share with the city and its visitors, leaving a craving to relive locations or the wonderful sites witnessed through travel.

Downtown Neighborhood Association sign on Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Downtown Neighborhood Association sign on Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Much of Central Avenue is decorated by murals that reflect the business types, seen here on the side of the El Rey theater is the art of a time when the theater was active in the craft of entertainment.

People walking by the El Rey theater on Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

People walking by the El Rey theater on Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Mural painted on the El Rey theater, Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Mural painted on the El Rey theater, Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Mural painted on the El Rey theater, Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)<span style="font-size: 14px; line-height: 1.5em;"></span>

Mural painted on the El Rey theater, Central Avenue. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Even parts of downtown have amazing murals that depict businessmen and nature scenes; against the blue sky backdrop large buildings break the horizon to accommodate the working class of downtown Albuquerque.

Buildings in downtown Albuquerque with nature-inspired murals. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Buildings in downtown Albuquerque with nature-inspired murals. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Businessmen mural just off Central Avenue on 7th Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Businessmen mural just off Central Avenue on 7th Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Tucked away on side streets that make up the backbone of downtown Albuquerque are beautiful murals that reflect the neighborhood and culture. Some of these murals are easy to find and others are hidden into the cityscape, seemingly only created for the amusement of the artist.

"The Styx" - Graffiti mural on Coal Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

“The Styx” – Graffiti mural on Coal Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

"The Styx" - Graffiti mural on Coal Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

“The Styx” – Graffiti mural on Coal Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Gaming graffiti mural on Lead Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Gaming graffiti mural on Lead Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Gaming graffiti mural on Lead Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Gaming graffiti mural on Lead Street. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Local Neighborhood Bakery Holds the Key to Success

Local neighborhood bakery featured on the Food Network, Golden Crown Panaderia has found success for more than 25 years by keeping it simple and being happy.

Local Neighborhood Bakery Holds the Key to Success from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

The Golden Crown Panaderia has been supplying the local community with an old-fashioned approach to baked goods and business practices. This approach has been successful mainly in part to the inviting environment created by the father and son duo, Pratt Morales and son Christopher Morales. For over 25 years this small bakery has been supplying much of Albuquerque with original breads and pastries. However not everything is old-fashioned about this neighborhood bakery.

Latte Art by Christopher Morales - Golden Crown Panaderia (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Latte Art by Christopher Morales – Golden Crown Panaderia (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

While many of the practices and products have not changed, it is the latte art and indoor garden that has given the Golden Crown Panaderia a modern point. Christopher Morales has taken up a craft that visually express what he considers the perfect cup of coffee, by combining an espresso shot and steamed milk. This results in an authentic artistic decoration on the top of a latte. Christopher Morales also began the bakery’s one of a kind indoor garden. The garden often produces herbs and produce that the bakery uses for its baked goods and other food items.

When asked about the goal for the bakery Christopher Morales says, “To be honest the ultimate goal is to be able to enjoy our lives.”

Continuing, Morales explains that there is no wish to expand or become a corporation. The intention for the bakery is to create great food and a good atmosphere, but also to enjoy what they do for a living. Morales described how easy it is to get overwhelmed in the restaurant industry, and says that when this occurs the interaction with the customer is lost.

“Every new customer that comes into the place, we get to hear their story,” Morales illustrates while sharing a few examples.

The human element is what Morales enjoys the most about his career, and he thinks of the employees as family, ensuring that the staff continues to enjoy the work they do at the bakery. This old-fashioned bakery has a modern touch and greets customers with a warm hospitality, finding success through what brings them happiness.

For More than a Century Women Continue to Struggle for Equal Rights

The Women’s Rights Movement and the continuing struggle for women to close the wage gap and combat violent acts such as rape and domestic violence in modern society, through awareness and action.

Modern Social Awareness of the Continuing Women’s Rights Struggle from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

The first women’s rights gathering happened over a hundred years ago in 1848 and women are still struggling to find equality. Through the Women’s Rights Movement momentum was started and helped achieve basic rights for women. Through this momentum voting rights where established, birth control clinics where opened and sexual harassment became discrimination. Also in 1903 the National Women’s Trade Union League was formed to advocate improved work conditions and better wages for women.

While education and experience often play the biggest part to career advancement, women are often overlooked for promotions or raises. Women’s earnings as a percent of men’s earnings have recently been on the decline for most women under 55 years of age. As you can see from the graph represented by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics that outlines the annual averages of women’s earnings as a percentage of men’s from 1979 to 2012. In an article from the White House it states that a woman by the age of 65 will have lost $431,000 over her working life to the earnings gap. Continuing on the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as of 2012 the largest percentages of job roles maintained by women are dental hygienists, teachers and secretaries.

Sarah Swanson a New Mexico resident who previously worked for law enforcement in Colorado had this to say about women and job roles. “I believe that women are overcoming set roles in different career fields.”

Continuing Swanson said, “I’ve worked in two heavily male-dominated fields; law enforcement and software. In law enforcement, civilian staff is heavily female, but a high majority of law enforcement officers are male.”

YWCA Online Information Fact Sheet. Click to Enhance. (YWCA Fact Releases and Brochure)

YWCA Online Information Fact Sheet. Click to Enhance. (YWCA Fact Releases and Brochure)

With this background in law enforcement Swanson did say, “One other thing I heard a lot of is that women should protect themselves against rape; don’t wear that, don’t drink too much, and so on. A woman should be completely safe naked and passed out in a bush.”

Additionally Swanson went on to say, “Instead of saying she shouldn’t have done something, how about putting the onus on the perpetrator to not rape? Rape is an act of a criminal.”

While women are still struggling to find equality they are also often the targets of violent acts such as rape and domestic violence. A report release by the White House, Rape and Sexual Assault: A Renewed Call to Action reveals that one in five women have been raped in their lifetimes and most victims know their assailants. The study also states that women of all races are targeted but some are more vulnerable such as multicultural women and Native American women being in the highest percentages of targeted sexual assault and rape. In New Mexico alone only 7% of suspects were arrested in rapes involving female victims. This comes from the Sex Crimes in New Mexico analysis of the 2012 data involving interpersonal violence. In most cases where victims know their assailants, repeated assaults could continue due to the low rate of suspect arrests.

Swanson with her background in law enforcement stated that, “I definitely have some experience in cases where women were victimized. From the statistics I’ve seen, women are most vulnerable to domestic violence when they’re pregnant.”

She goes on to add, “I would also say that women are often victimized when they don’t have a lot of options; say, when they have children that are being supported by the perpetrator, or the perpetrator is the victim’s supervisor, being two examples.”

Lastly Swanson stated, “Women generally want the same treatment, respect, and opportunities as anyone else does.”

President Barack Obama and his Administration have been taking action to end sexual assault and rape. As part of the national effort President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum on January 22nd, 2014 to help combat sexual assault and rape. This is in the hopes of protecting victims of sexual assault and rape by changing the responses and common social outlook upon these acts so every American can feel safe to pursue their dreams.

Local Holocaust and Intolerance Museum Combats Hate Through Education

Hate and intolerance have been a part of an unfortunate world history and even current modern events. The Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico is helping Albuquerque and the world remember these injustices; in hopes to prevent future acts of hate and genocide.

Local Holocaust and Intolerance Museum Combats Hate Through Education from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

While hate and intolerance are words that seem ugly on their own, they can become something tragically worse. These words are actions that can become violent and damaging to everyone involved. Unfortunately these are words that are not out grown even though they are not words known to a new born. In a Tolerance for Teen’s factoid it states that, an individual is not born with hate for a whole group of people for any reason other than one’s own bias. But instead this form of hate is a learned behavior. Since this is a learned behavior it means hate and intolerance can be avoided.

The word “hate crime” wasn’t really in use until after World War II, in which a government attempted a racial genocide. The Holocaust was a period of time from January 30th 1933 until May 8th 1945. During this time more than six million Jews and five million others deemed as inferior by Hitler and the German Nazi regime were systematically exterminated. Some of the five million included homosexuals, mentally or physically impaired, Gypsies, religious groups and anyone who really opposed the Nazi regime. Even before the Holocaust there was the Armenian Genocide of the early 20th century by the Ottoman government. The Ottomans also attempted a systematic extermination, by forced deportations and massacres of the Armenians in what is now modern day Turkey.

Harold L. Folley, volunteer at the Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico in Albuquerque. (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Harold L. Folley, volunteer at the Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico in Albuquerque. (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Additionally the United States has also had moments of hate and intolerance, from slavery in the 17th to 19th centuries to modern intolerance of sexual orientation, race and religion. The Southern Poverty Law Center monitors some 1,007 known hate groups operating across the United States. In the 2012 statistics released by the FBI in the Offense Type by Bias Motivation report, race has the highest total offenses. The total offenses motivated by sexual orientation and religion combined do not even total the offenses committed on a race bias. While the majority of hate crimes in the United States are race motivated, the offender is mostly driven by the desire for excitement.

The Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico stands as a reminder that nothing good comes from intolerance and hate based on what a person is as opposed to who they are: a son, a mother, a daughter or even a father. While the museum is that reminder it promotes people to be the conduit of change against all forms of hate.