Protesters Take to the Streets in Albuquerque Over Disapproval of Police Shootings

This is the second wave of protests amidst recent Albuquerque police shootings that have left a homeless man dead, it started at 12:00 pm MST and kicked off with the protest beginning on Central Avenue.

Many showed up wearing Guy Fawkes masks and holding signs in support of Anonymous. The cyber group Anonymous has taken down APD sites with cyber attacks and even intercepted cabq.gov official email contents. Anonymous is standing with the demonstrators calling for a change.

The protests began on Central Avenue but the demonstrators marched to the Albuquerque Police Department. This is where many spoke about their experiences and called for an end to the shootings. The demonstrators were later met with police in riot gear once the march headed downtown. With the protesters calling for change, will the city of Albuquerque listen; two protests in one-week makes it certain they have heard the call.

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

APD Protests. Albuquerque, NM (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Local Neighborhood Bakery Holds the Key to Success

Local neighborhood bakery featured on the Food Network, Golden Crown Panaderia has found success for more than 25 years by keeping it simple and being happy.

Local Neighborhood Bakery Holds the Key to Success from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

The Golden Crown Panaderia has been supplying the local community with an old-fashioned approach to baked goods and business practices. This approach has been successful mainly in part to the inviting environment created by the father and son duo, Pratt Morales and son Christopher Morales. For over 25 years this small bakery has been supplying much of Albuquerque with original breads and pastries. However not everything is old-fashioned about this neighborhood bakery.

Latte Art by Christopher Morales - Golden Crown Panaderia (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Latte Art by Christopher Morales – Golden Crown Panaderia (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

While many of the practices and products have not changed, it is the latte art and indoor garden that has given the Golden Crown Panaderia a modern point. Christopher Morales has taken up a craft that visually express what he considers the perfect cup of coffee, by combining an espresso shot and steamed milk. This results in an authentic artistic decoration on the top of a latte. Christopher Morales also began the bakery’s one of a kind indoor garden. The garden often produces herbs and produce that the bakery uses for its baked goods and other food items.

When asked about the goal for the bakery Christopher Morales says, “To be honest the ultimate goal is to be able to enjoy our lives.”

Continuing, Morales explains that there is no wish to expand or become a corporation. The intention for the bakery is to create great food and a good atmosphere, but also to enjoy what they do for a living. Morales described how easy it is to get overwhelmed in the restaurant industry, and says that when this occurs the interaction with the customer is lost.

“Every new customer that comes into the place, we get to hear their story,” Morales illustrates while sharing a few examples.

The human element is what Morales enjoys the most about his career, and he thinks of the employees as family, ensuring that the staff continues to enjoy the work they do at the bakery. This old-fashioned bakery has a modern touch and greets customers with a warm hospitality, finding success through what brings them happiness.

The Albuquerque Museum Invites Visitors Into the Homes of the Spanish American Elite of the New World

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898, is an exhibition on display at The Albuquerque Museum that explores themes from the private lives of the Spanish American privileged, focusing on their homes in the early colonial era through the nineteenth century.

The Albuquerque Museum Invites Visitors Into the Homes of the Spanish American Elite of the New World from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

The exhibition itself demonstrates the wealth and lineage of the early Spanish Americans, through the homes and the objects that adorned each room. This is not just limited to great works of art but also the luxurious textiles, sculptures and items that made up the faith, wealth and socio-racial status of the colonial Spanish Americans.

Behind Closed Doors is the first major exhibition that showcases and explores the private lives, social structures, and wealth of Spain’s colonial era elite. The exhibition is on a four-city tour with Albuquerque being the second stop. When the early conquistadors ventured into the Americas they brought an affluent heritage along with them. Much of this heritage can be seen throughout New Mexican culture but not in such luxurious and grand standings.

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898, Center Gallery of Exhibition. The Albuquerque Museum - Albuquerque, New Mexico

Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492–1898, Center Gallery of Exhibition. The Albuquerque Museum – Albuquerque, New Mexico

The collection primarily consists of works from the Brooklyn Museum and boasts some 160 paintings, sculptures, prints, textiles, and decorative objects. What feels like the center of the exhibition is a screen depicting the Siege of Belgrade on the front and a decorative hunting scene on the reverse, this is a piece from Mexico, circa 1697-1701. Outstretching from this piece are large satellites of paintings and objects such as a bed frame gilded in gold that catches the light with a beautiful glow. With a commanding presence a large masterpiece by Francisco de Goya y Lucientes entitled Don Tadeo Bravo de Rivero hangs in the main room. This piece captures Tadeo Bravo, who is adorned with the cross and jeweled badge of the distinguished Spanish Order of Santiago.

Don Tadeo Bravo de Rivero, 1806 Oil on Canvas By Francisco de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish,1746-1828) at The Albuquerque Museum - Albuquerque, New Mexico

Don Tadeo Bravo de Rivero, 1806 Oil on Canvas By Francisco de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish,1746-1828) The Albuquerque Museum – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Many objects in this exhibition are placed, as they would have been viewed in these early Spanish American homes of the new world. Walking though each room gives the viewer a sense of going back in time, with the rich culture and extravagant icons of social standing the Spanish brought with them to the Americas.

For More than a Century Women Continue to Struggle for Equal Rights

The Women’s Rights Movement and the continuing struggle for women to close the wage gap and combat violent acts such as rape and domestic violence in modern society, through awareness and action.

Modern Social Awareness of the Continuing Women’s Rights Struggle from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

The first women’s rights gathering happened over a hundred years ago in 1848 and women are still struggling to find equality. Through the Women’s Rights Movement momentum was started and helped achieve basic rights for women. Through this momentum voting rights where established, birth control clinics where opened and sexual harassment became discrimination. Also in 1903 the National Women’s Trade Union League was formed to advocate improved work conditions and better wages for women.

While education and experience often play the biggest part to career advancement, women are often overlooked for promotions or raises. Women’s earnings as a percent of men’s earnings have recently been on the decline for most women under 55 years of age. As you can see from the graph represented by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics that outlines the annual averages of women’s earnings as a percentage of men’s from 1979 to 2012. In an article from the White House it states that a woman by the age of 65 will have lost $431,000 over her working life to the earnings gap. Continuing on the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as of 2012 the largest percentages of job roles maintained by women are dental hygienists, teachers and secretaries.

Sarah Swanson a New Mexico resident who previously worked for law enforcement in Colorado had this to say about women and job roles. “I believe that women are overcoming set roles in different career fields.”

Continuing Swanson said, “I’ve worked in two heavily male-dominated fields; law enforcement and software. In law enforcement, civilian staff is heavily female, but a high majority of law enforcement officers are male.”

YWCA Online Information Fact Sheet. Click to Enhance. (YWCA Fact Releases and Brochure)

YWCA Online Information Fact Sheet. Click to Enhance. (YWCA Fact Releases and Brochure)

With this background in law enforcement Swanson did say, “One other thing I heard a lot of is that women should protect themselves against rape; don’t wear that, don’t drink too much, and so on. A woman should be completely safe naked and passed out in a bush.”

Additionally Swanson went on to say, “Instead of saying she shouldn’t have done something, how about putting the onus on the perpetrator to not rape? Rape is an act of a criminal.”

While women are still struggling to find equality they are also often the targets of violent acts such as rape and domestic violence. A report release by the White House, Rape and Sexual Assault: A Renewed Call to Action reveals that one in five women have been raped in their lifetimes and most victims know their assailants. The study also states that women of all races are targeted but some are more vulnerable such as multicultural women and Native American women being in the highest percentages of targeted sexual assault and rape. In New Mexico alone only 7% of suspects were arrested in rapes involving female victims. This comes from the Sex Crimes in New Mexico analysis of the 2012 data involving interpersonal violence. In most cases where victims know their assailants, repeated assaults could continue due to the low rate of suspect arrests.

Swanson with her background in law enforcement stated that, “I definitely have some experience in cases where women were victimized. From the statistics I’ve seen, women are most vulnerable to domestic violence when they’re pregnant.”

She goes on to add, “I would also say that women are often victimized when they don’t have a lot of options; say, when they have children that are being supported by the perpetrator, or the perpetrator is the victim’s supervisor, being two examples.”

Lastly Swanson stated, “Women generally want the same treatment, respect, and opportunities as anyone else does.”

President Barack Obama and his Administration have been taking action to end sexual assault and rape. As part of the national effort President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum on January 22nd, 2014 to help combat sexual assault and rape. This is in the hopes of protecting victims of sexual assault and rape by changing the responses and common social outlook upon these acts so every American can feel safe to pursue their dreams.

The Elephant’s Trumpet: A Story of a Loving Mother and the Future of a Herd

The love of family along with the Albuquerque BioPark Zoo is helping one mother elephant preserve her species that has become endangered due to habitat loss and the extreme poaching for ivory tusks.

The Elephant’s Trumpet: A Story of a Loving Mother and the Future of a Herd from Kevin Charles Moore on Vimeo.

Rozie is an Asian elephant that was born to the Albuquerque BioPark Zoo in 1993 for the purpose of maintaining the species. Since then Rozie has mothered two of her own offspring and is helping ensure a future for the Asian elephant species, not just a memory.

Currently the BioPark has seven Asian elephants two of them being young males and five females counting the newest edition, Rozie’s very young calf Jazmine. The park is one of the few United States facilities to have success in breeding and raising elephants in captivity. This is very beneficial to maintaining the species since the Asian elephant population is constantly threatened by human activities in the wild.

The ABQ BioPark Zoo At A Glance. Click to Enhance. (ABQ BioPark Zoo Brochure Map)

The ABQ BioPark Zoo At A Glance. Click to Enhance. (ABQ BioPark Zoo Brochure Map)

Before Rozie’s birth the park didn’t have what it has today in the herd. Female Asian elephants are very social and often form groups that become herds; these groups are lead by the matriarch. The matriarch is the oldest female of the group. By creating the herd the park is able to allow the elephants to have the natural dynamic and social structure seen in the wild. This also helps the zookeepers understand and care for the elephant’s physical and psychological wellbeing.

Currently there are five species of elephants that are endangered and other elephant species like the African elephant are vulnerable to this threat. The biggest threat to elephants in the wild is the shrinking habitat, poaching and illegal sale of ivory. The loss of habitat means elephants are living closer to human society and a struggle for food can cause the devastation of a farmer’s crop. This puts elephants at risk for retaliation from a farmer to insure crop loss or damage doesn’t happen again. The majority of the time elephants are poached specifically for the ivory in their tusks and then sold on illegal markets, aiding to the dwindling population. The United States Congress recognized this struggle in 1997 and introduced the Asian Elephant Conservation Act, which allows funding for the conservation of Asian elephants.

Baby Jazmine and her Grandmother Alice playing in the yard at the ABQ BioPark. (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

Baby Jazmine and her Grandmother Alice playing in the yard at the ABQ BioPark. (Photo by K. Charles Moore/ Full Sail University)

On February 11th, 2014 the Press Secretary for The White House released a fact sheet on the National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking. The goal is to establish principles for the United States to combat illegal wildlife trade and ban the commercial trade of elephant ivory. This is to ensure that the United States is not a contributing factor to the diminishing numbers of endangered species due to illegal trade or poaching.